Our mission is to increase literacy for all children and adults by using The Spalding Method to develop skilled readers, critical listeners, and accomplished writers and spellers.

Why Spalding?

Education begins with literacy, and the inclusive and integrated The Writing Road to Reading (WRTR) program is successful at teaching literacy.

Those who undertake the courses and implement the total Spalding program frequently and consistently agree it is the best professional development they have completed. You will be astounded by the results the program universally achieves in such a short time. WRTR is the complete package and your search for a total program in all facets of English is finally complete.


“The Writing Road to Reading Program provides language instruction at the sound, word, sentence, and paragraph levels. The program’s multisensory instructional delivery system develops both visual-motor and auditory processing skills required for success with language in print. Students who are instructed with this program become confident, effective readers and communicators.”
— Ann Remond, PhD, Cognitive Scientist, Sydney, Australia
“The language arts are considered foundational and paramount to all of the many academic skills taught at Fort Casper Academy. The Spalding Method is a structured, thorough, and consistent way for students to learn all the language skills. As a result, student proficiency in reading, writing, spelling, and comprehension is outstanding. Parents are excited about the growth they see in their children’s reading skills, and teachers are appreciative of the precise training available through Spalding Education International.”
— Randall Larson, Principal at Fort Casper Academy, Casper, Wyoming
“Despite having a master’s degree in learning disabilities, I was not successful in teaching my special education students (many of whom were dyslexic) what they most wanted to learn- how to read- until I took my first Spalding course in 1985. Since that time, I have seen many angry, withdrawn, or depressed students become eager, participating learners because they finally understand how English works. As I continue to teach students who are falling through the cracks of our education system, I know that I will never stop using this wonderful method.”
— Eileen Oliver, Retired Special Education Teacher, Birmingham, Alabama

research proves success

TerraNova   is a series of standardized achievement tests used in the United States designed to assess K-12 student achievement in reading, language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, vocabulary, spelling, and other areas. This data was found in the ASU research study of the TerraNova testing done in 2009.

TerraNova is a series of standardized achievement tests used in the United States designed to assess K-12 student achievement in reading, language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, vocabulary, spelling, and other areas. This data was found in the ASU research study of the TerraNova testing done in 2009.

There are many programs and methods for teaching children how to spell, write and read. But when The Spalding Method was compared with two of the most popular mainstream reading programs, the Arizona State University study showed Spalding students' achievement test scores were significantly higher.

The four-year findings strongly suggest that use of "The Writing Road to Reading" (the textbook used in The Spalding Method) is an effective method for enhancing performance on critical early literacy skills.

The study started in the 2006-2007 school year and concluded with the 2009-2010 school year. It included 11 Arizona schools where an average of 1,000 general education kindergarten through third-grade students participated in each of the four years. Five experimental schools used "The Writing Road to Reading" (also referred to as The Spalding Method) and six control schools used one of two mainstream reading programs, published by Harcourt School Publishers or Houghton Mifflin. All students were tested three times annually on Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS).

The report states, "In each administration, Spalding students had consistently higher mean values on all DIBELS areas, which provides evidence that Spalding has been more effective than the methods used in the control schools to teach those reading skills."

According to the researchers, since both the control and experimental groups used detailed teacher guides evaluated by the Arizona Department of Education for research-based reading components, theoretically, they should have produced similar results. That was not the case as Spalding students' results differed dramatically. For example, in the final test for second graders the mean oral reading fluency score for those using The Spalding Method was 109.96, compared to 87.48 for those using one of the two mainstream reading programs at a control school.